Products of Change

DRIVING SUSTAINABLE
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Tue 09 Feb 2021 | by Michelle Urquhart

New racing series to 3D print trophies

Extreme E, a brand-new motorsport series which aims to highlight the issue of the climate crisis, will create the winners’ trophies from consumer plastic waste using 3D printing. Extreme E has appointed 3devo, a Dutch tech company to supply equipment and training which will enable the transformation of plastic waste into filament for 3D printing applications, including the series winners’ trophies. Extreme E is a radical new racing series, which will see electric SUVs competing in extreme environments around the world which have already been damaged or affected by climate and environmental issues. The five-race global voyage highlights the impact of climate change and human interference in some of the world’s most remote locations and promotes the adoption of electric vehicles in the quest for a lower carbon future for the planet. Ali Russell, chief marketing officer at Extreme E, said: “This concept from 3devo was founded by a group of young inventive engineers and I’m delighted Extreme E is able to implement this technology. The 3devo mission to assist businesses to be more sustainable is a shared vision of Extreme E, which is why the series is looking for lower carbon intensive ways to run the championship from zero emission vehicles, right through to trophy creation. It is incredibly satisfying to know that using ocean plastic for our trophies has a positive impact on the environment, and I can’t wait to see our inaugural race winners lift them in Saudi Arabia on the 4 April.” To minimise local impact, Extreme E races will not be open to spectators, with fans instead invited to follow the action through live TV broadcast, and on social media. Extreme E is also pioneering hydrogen fuel cell technology which will enable its race fleet to be charged using zero emission energy. This innovative solution from AFC Energy uses water and sun to generate hydrogen power. Not only will this process emit no greenhouse emissions, its only by-product will be water, which will be utilised elsewhere on-site.